Tickets

  • Tue 03 May 7:30PM
  • Thu 05 May 7:30PM
  • Sun 08 May 7:30PM
  • Tue 10 May 7:30PM

Sorry, you missed this one

VENUE

Venue TBA.

Flooding with Love for the Kid

Director • Zachary Oberzan

Country • USA

Year • 2010

Duration • 100 min

“His name was Rambo, and he was just some nothing kid…”

Meticulously adapted from David Morrell’s novel First Blood, which introduced the world to a young man named Rambo and his war against a small town and its sheriff, Flooding With Love For The Kid is in itself a one-man cinematic war.

Shot entirely for $96 in a 220 square-foot studio apartment in Manhattan, it was adapted, directed, filmed, acted, designed, and edited by one man. Actor and filmmaker Zachary Oberzan, performing all two dozen characters himself, has created a monumental testament to the animal ingenuity and triumphant spirit of the lone artist with no money, no resources, no nothing.

A wild, violent and compassionate ride through the back hills and caves of Kentucky, this film and its maker embrace their extreme limitations, ultimately transcending them. As Rambo and Sheriff Teasle hunt each other in the woods, the audience is forced to redefine their very concept of ‘suspension of disbelief’. How and why this story is told offers a statement far larger than the story itself. What do you need to make a good film? How much money? How many actors? How much space? Can you make a great narrative film with nothing but your love of the work?

Completely transgressive yet action-packed and heartbreaking, Flooding With Love For The Kid destroys all previous notions of low-budget filmmaking with a determination lifted from Rambo’s own infuriated rampage.

Followed by The Making of Flooding with Love… also by Zachary Oberzan.

“An absolutely amazing concept. Wildly creative and energetic.”

–David Morrell, The New York Times bestselling author of First Blood

“Bat-shit insane… disarmingly effective – a guerrilla assault on the notion that high production values are necessary for compelling storytelling.”

–The Guardian